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Your Christmas tree may harbor up to 25,000 ‘freeloading’ insects: scientist

Your Christmas tree may harbor up to 25,000 ‘freeloading’ insects: scientist via http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/12/19/your-christmas-tree-may-harbor-up-to-25000-freeloading-insects-scientist/

By Agence France-Presse

Christmas tree illustration via Shutterstock

 

“Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse.”

Er, not quite.

Get a magnifying glass and take a close look at your Christmas tree, says a scientist.

In all likelihood, it is harbouring thousands of bugs.

Bark lice, mites, moths and the odd spider are among the tiny creatures that live on pine trees and find themselves dragged into homes when Christmas comes around, says Bjarte Jordal at Norway’s University Museum of Bergen.

Stimulated by the lights and warmth, they emerge from hibernation in your living room.

“In research on Christmas trees there have been found as many as 25,000 individual (insects)… in some of the trees,” says Jordal.

He adds, though: “As they cannot feed on the limited plants found in most households, the bugs will quickly dry out and die.

“These insects and bugs do not constitute any risk or danger to people or furniture. And if anyone is worried about allergic reactions, I don’t think there’s any danger of that.”

Funny Pest Meme’s

Checkout this funny pest Meme below! :)

Ants: Commonly Infested Areas in the Home

Photo Contest Deadline is December 5

Photo Contest Deadline is December 5

Don’t forget to submit your best photo to PCT by Dec. 5 for a chance to win $500. PCT’s annual Best Pest Photo Contest is your chance to be recognized alongside your peers for having taken one of the best photographs in the pest control industry.

Don’t forget to submit your best photo to PCT by Dec. 5 for a chance to win $500. PCT’s annual Best Pest Photo Contest is your chance to be recognized alongside your peers for having taken one of the best photographs in the pest control industry. Photos will be judged on color, clarity and content. In addition to the photo, please provide:
•    Identification of the pest
•    Where the photo was taken
•    Anything else unique about the photo or circumstance under which it was taken

Send this year’s nominations* via e-mail to photocontest@giemedia.com or mail to: PCT Online, c/o Brad Harbison, 4020 Kinross Lakes Pkwy., Ste. 201, Richfield, OH  44286.
*Important note: There is a limit of one photo per entrant.

 

• Identification of the pest
• Where the photo was taken
• Anything else unique about the photo or circumstance under which it was taken

Send this year’s nominations* via e-mail to photocontest@giemedia.com or mail to: PCT Online, c/o Brad Harbison, 4020 Kinross Lakes Pkwy., Ste. 201, Richfield, OH 44286.
*Important note: There is a limit of one photo per entrant.

Subterranean Termites

Subterranean Termites

Family Rhinotermitidae

Subterranean termites live in underground colonies or in moist secluded areas aboveground that can contain up to 2 million members. They build distinctive “mud tubes” to gain access to food sources and to protect themselves from open air. Termite colonies are organized into castes depending on tasks — workers, soldiers and reproductives. The characteristics of a subterranean termite are dependent on the termite’s role in the colony. Cream-colored Worker subterranean termites are 1/8 to 3/8′s of an inch in length. Soldier subterranean termites are of a similar body length, but are distinguished by their powerful mandibles. Solider termites have cream-colored bodies and brown heads. Reproductive subterranean termites are approximately one inch long.HabitsSubterranean termites live underground and build tunnels, referred to as mud tubes, to reach food sources. Like other termite species, they feed on products containing cellulose. Subterranean termites swarm in the spring — groups of reproductive termites go off to start new colonies.HabitatSubterranean termites need contact with the soil to survive and live underground. They can build tunnels through cracks in concrete.ThreatsSubterranean termites are by far the most destructive species. They can collapse a building entirely, meaning possible financial ruin for a homeowner. The hard, saw-toothed jaws of termites work like shears and are able to bite off extremely small fragments of wood, one piece at a time. If you suspect infestation, contact a pest professional about subterranean termite treatment.

How to Prevent and Treat Cockroach Infestations